Intravenous Vitamin C And Cancer A Systematic Review Pdf

intravenous vitamin c and cancer a systematic review pdf

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Published: 17.05.2021

Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, is an essential nutrient, widely recognized for its antioxidant properties. These properties arise from its potent redox potential due to its capacity to donate electrons to oxidized molecules. Even in small quantities vitamin C can protect critical molecules in the body such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids DNA and RNA from damage by reactive oxygen species, which are generated during normal metabolism, by active immune cells, and through exposure to toxins and pollutants e. The vitamin also plays a critical role as a cofactor — a molecule that assists enzymes in chemical reactions. This dual nature of vitamin C means that it is instrumental in multiple physiological processes, including those involved in the biosynthesis of collagen, carnitine, and catecholamines.

Intravenous ascorbic acid

Vitamin C L-ascorbic acid is a potent reducing agent, meaning that it readily donates electrons to recipient molecules Figure 1. Vitamin C is the primary water-soluble, non-enzymatic antioxidant in plasma and tissues. Even in small amounts, vitamin C can protect indispensable molecules in the body, such as proteins , lipids fats , carbohydrates , and nucleic acids DNA and RNA , from damage by free radicals and reactive oxygen species ROS that are generated during normal metabolism , by active immune cells, and through exposure to toxins and pollutants e. Vitamin C also participates in redox recycling of other important antioxidants; for example, vitamin C is known to regenerate vitamin E from its oxidized form see the article on Vitamin E. The role of vitamin C as a cofactor is also related to its redox potential. By maintaining enzyme-bound metals in their reduced forms, vitamin C assists mixed-function oxidases in the synthesis of several critical biomolecules 1.

Background: Ascorbate vitamin C has been evaluated as a potential treatment for cancer as an independent agent and in combination with standard chemotherapies. This review assesses the evidence for safety and clinical effectiveness of intravenous IV ascorbate in treating various types of cancer. Results were screened by three of the authors GN, RP, and CJP to determine if they met inclusion criteria, and then summarized using a narrative approach. Results: A total of 23 trials involving patients met the inclusion criteria. Only one trial, in ovarian cancer, randomized patients to receive vitamin C or standard of care chemotherapy.

Systematic Review of Intravenous Ascorbate in Cancer Clinical Trials

Many cancer patients on intensive chemotherapy lack vitamin C. Vitamin C stimulates the production and activation of immune cells, so perhaps supplementation could be used to improve the immunity in those patients. This review assesses the effectiveness and safety of vitamin C administration in cancer. A total of 19 trials were included. In only 4 trials randomization was used to determine if patients received vitamin C or a placebo.

The use of intravenous vitamin C IVC for cancer therapy has long been an area of intense controversy. Despite this, high dose IVC has been administered for decades by complementary health care practitioners and physicians, with little evidence base resulting in inconsistent clinical practice. In this review we pose a series of questions of relevance to both researchers and clinicians, and also patients themselves, in order to identify current gaps in our knowledge. These questions include: Do oncology patients have compromised vitamin C status? Is intravenous the optimal route of vitamin C administration?

Vitamin C is an antioxidant that may scavenge reactive oxygen species preventing DNA damage and other effects important in cancer transformation. Dietary vitamin C from natural sources is taken with other compounds affecting its bioavailability and biological effects. High pharmacological doses of vitamin C may induce prooxidant effects, detrimental for cancer cells. An oxidized form of vitamin C, dehydroascorbate, is transported through glucose transporters, and cancer cells switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis in energy production so an excess of vitamin C may limit glucose transport and ATP production resulting in energetic crisis and cell death. Vitamin C may change the metabolomic and epigenetic profiles of cancer cells, and activation of ten-eleven translocation TET proteins and downregulation of pluripotency factors by the vitamin may eradicate cancer stem cells. Metastasis, the main reason of cancer-related deaths, requires breakage of anatomical barriers containing collagen, whose synthesis is promoted by vitamin C.

Intravenous Vitamin C for Cancer Therapy – Identifying the Current Gaps in Our Knowledge

Intravenous Ascorbic Acid also known as vitamin C or L-ascorbic acid , is a type of therapy that delivers soluble ascorbic acid directly into the bloodstream, either administered via injection or infusion. Intravenous ascorbic acid is used as a dietary supplement for nutritional deficiencies and also, as complementary therapy to cancer treatments. The use of intravenous ascorbic acid as a cancer treatment or co-treatment has been a controversial topic since the emergence of misleading data in the s.

Metrics details. Few specific medications have been proven effective for the treatment of patients with severe coronavirus disease COVID

Со вчерашнего дня. ГЛАВА 128 Когда Сьюзан проснулась, солнце уже светило вовсю. Его нежные лучи проникали сквозь занавеску и падали на пуховую перину.

IVC Protocol

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